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Essential Oils

 
Essential Oils - Artisan Soaps - oils

 

Disclaimer

The information provided herein is for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to treat, cure, prevent or diagnose. This information may not be complete, nor may its data be accurate.  It is suggested that you do your own research on essential oils as well. 

As with all essential oils, never use them undiluted. You can dilute your oils in a carrier oil such as fractionated coconut oil, olive oil, sunflower oil.  Do not take internally unless working with a qualified and expert practitioner. Keep away from children. If applying an essential oil to your skin, always perform a small patch test to an insensitive part of the body (after you have properly diluted the oil in an appropriate carrier). 

Note:  No governmental agency or generally accepted organization "grades" or "certifies" essential oils as "therapeutic grade," "medicinal grade," or "aromatherapy grade" in the U.S.  Therefore, if someone is telling you that their oils are better because they are therapeutic grade, they are using a term created by certain companies in an effort to charge more for their products.  We get our essential oils from a company created and run by Dr. Robert Pappas, a man revered in his field.  At one time, he was asked to be, and was, on the board of Young Living but has since stepped down from that position.  He is an expert in the field and we purchase our essential oils only from his company and offer these oils at a much more reasonable price than most other companies. 

 

1 ounce bottles

Lavender -

Botanical Name:  Lavandula angustifolia

Common Method Of Extraction:  Steam distilled

Parts Used:  Flowering tops

Aroma:  Fresh, slightly spicy, herbaceous, floral

Largest Producing Countries:  USA, Spain, and France

Safety Information: Essential Oil Safety by Robert Tisserand does not indicate any special precautions when using Lavender Oil. [Robert Tisserand, Essential Oil Safety (United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone, 1995), 207.]

Patchouli -

Botanical Name: Pogostemon cablin

Common Method Of Extraction:  Steam distilled

Parts Used:  Leaves

Aroma:  Earthy, smoky, spicy, and musky

Largest Producing Countries:  Sri Lanka, Indonesia, and India

Safety Information: Essential Oil Safety by Robert Tisserand does not indicate any special precautions when using this oil. [Robert Tisserand, Essential Oil Safety (United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone, 1995), 209.]

Clove Bud -

Botanical Name:  Syzygium aromaticum

Common Method Of Extraction:  Steam distilled

Parts Used:  Flower buds

Aroma:  Warm, spicy, woody, with a slightly fruity top note

Safety Information: Clove Oil is a mucous membrane and dermal irritant. Avoid Clove Oil in alcoholism, in haemophilia, in prostatic cancer, with kidney and liver problems and if taking anticoagulants. [Robert Tisserand, Essential Oil Safety (United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone, 1995), 131.

Wild Orange -

Botanical Name:  Citrus sinensis

Common Method Of Extraction:  Cold pressed

Parts Used:  Fruit peel

Aroma:  Sweet, sugary, and citrus

Safety Information: Lawless reports that a few people have experienced dermatitis from the limonene content of Sweet Orange Oil. [Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 122.]

Peppermint -

Botanical Name:  Mentha piperita

Common Method Of Extraction:  Steam distilled

Parts Used:  Flowering plant

Aroma:  Fresh, very minty, hot, herbaceous, with a vegetative back note

Traditional Use:  Has many culinary and pharmaceutical uses. It is also used for its soothing qualities on the digestive system.

Safety Information: Avoid Peppermint Oil in cardiac fibrillation, epilepsy, fever. Peppermint Oil is a mucous membrane irritant and neurotoxic (toxic to the nerves). Some of this information applies to oral use, but is provided for informational purposes (no essential oil should be taken internally without the guidance of a qualified aromatherapy practitioner). [Robert Tisserand, Essential Oil Safety (United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone, 1995), 160.]

Tea Tree -

Botanical Name:  Melaleuca alternifolia

Common Method Of Extraction:  Steam distilled

Parts Used:  Leaves and twigs

Aroma:  Warm, Fresh, spicy-camphoraceous

Largest Producing Countries:  Australia and Kenya

Traditional Use:  Widely known for its healing properties for the skin.

Safety Information: Tea Tree Oil may cause sensitization in some. [Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 168.]

Lemongrass -

Botanical Name:  Cymbopogon flexuosus

Common Method Of Extraction:  Steam distilled

Parts Used:  Grass

Aroma:  Heavy, lemony, green

Largest Producing Countries:  Sri Lanka, Madagascar, and Nepal

Traditional Use:  The oil is widely used as an addition to bug repellants, and for its lemony aroma.

Safety Information: Avoid Lemongrass Oil in glaucoma and with children. Use caution in prostatic hyperplasia and with skin hypersensitivity or damaged skin. There is a slight risk of sensitization when using Lemongrass Oil. [Robert Tisserand, Essential Oil Safety (United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone, 1995), 82, 146.]

Eucalyptus -

Aroma:  Fresh, penetrating, woody, camphoraceous

Largest Producing Countries:  Australia, Brazil, and Spain

Traditional Use:  Eucalyptus is one of the oldest native medicines used in Australia. It is known now for its use in inhalants and vapor rubs, and as a household disinfectant and cleaner.

Safety Information: Eucalyptus Oil is very toxic when taken orally (no essential oil should be taken internally without the guidance of a qualified aromatherapy practitioner). [Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 141.]

Star Anise -

Star Anise Oil (Illicium verum) is sometimes confused with Anise Oil (Pimpinella anisum) because both have similar names, both possess a similar aroma and both have similar, but not completely, identical properties.

Star Anise Essential Oil has an aroma similar to black licorice. Star Anise Oil can be useful in diffuser and inhaler blends intended to help ease bronchitis, colds and the flu.

Star Anise Oil may also be helpful in aromatherapy blends that are intended to help digestion and muscular aches or pains.

Botanical Name: Illicium verum

Common Method of Extraction: Steam Distilled

Parts Used: Seeds

Aroma:  Sharp, anise and licorice-like aroma.

Safety Information: Star Anise Oil is narcotic and slows circulation when used in large doses. [Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 152.] Slight risk of sensitization. [Robert Tisserand, Essential Oil Safety (United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone, 1995), 82.]

Tisserand also cautions to avoid Star Anise Oil in cases of alcoholism, liver disease, paracetamol use, breast-feeding, pregnancy, endometriosis, certain cancers, hyperplasia, damaged skin and with young children. [Robert Tisserand, Essential Oil Safety (United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone, 1995), 171.]

Oils
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